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We’ve all heard the term “beauty sleep” but is there anything more to the myth that the more sleep we get, the more attractive we become. Well a new study, published by the Royal Society Open Science Journal, appears to have confirmed the myth – a lack of sleep will make us less attractive – meaning we do indeed need to catch up on our beauty sleep! In fact, as little as two nights of a poor less is enough to make us look significantly less attractive. 

The study, which was undertaken by Stockholm University, saw 25 participants being asked to get a good night’s sleep for two consecutive nights. The following week, the same 25 participants were asked to restrict their sleep to just 4 hours a night on two consecutive nights.

Lack of SleepAfter each of these sessions, the 25 participants had make-up free photographs taken. These photographs were then shown to 122 strangers of both genders, who would rate them on health, attractiveness, trustworthiness and how sleepy they looked.

The results showed that those pictures taken with just 4 hours’ sleep, had clear visible signs of sleep deprivation that was easy for the volunteers to spot such as swollen eyelids and dark circles under the eyes. More surprisingly, the sleep-deprived photos showed a face that the volunteers would be less likely to socialise with. This is because these photos portrayed a person that was less attractive, untrustworthy and less healthy – all of which made the volunteers want to avoid that person.

This, according to the researchers on the projects, is a perfectly natural instinct that is imprinted onto our very DNA. Because a sleep-deprived individual looks less healthy than a person who has had a good night’s sleep, our instincts are to avoid them. Just like animals, we like to avoid people who we think might be diseased or be contagious. Just like we avoid the person with a cold in the office!

Instead, we are much more likely to project positive and happy thoughts towards more attractive people. Of course, this might be more sensible, as tired people are known to have some less than desirable qualities. This can include grumpiness, being less optimistic or sociable, being less empathetic, more accident-prone and are not as good at recognising emotions in others.

This means that sleep deprivation could have a seriously bad impact on our day-to-day lives. Whether it’s a job interview or something like a date, if we’ve had less sleep than we should then it could be that the other person is genetically predisposed to avoid us.

So, what’s the answer?

Well there is a simple answer, we just need to catch up on our beauty sleep!

This means that you’ll have to make certain changes in your life to ensure that you get the appropriate 6-8 hours of quality sleep as much as possible. To do this you’ll need to pinpoint exactly what it is that’s keeping you from getting that sleep.

For some, more sleep is an easy fix, as it’s just a case of spending too much time at night on the internet, social media or watching television/films. It could also be too busy a social life. But, some sacrifices need to be made in order to ensure you get that beauty sleep – which means cutting down on the late nights! At least for some of the week.

For others, getting sleep is a more of an ordeal as although you want to sleep, it evades you. In this case, you need to evaluate you sleep routine and look at what you can fix. This may be changing your mattress, bedroom or even developing a sleeping ritual that helps you sleep.

Either way, ensuring you get enough sleep is more than just for looking pretty, it’s also integral to our health and well-being.

So, if it’s a new mattress that’s needed we are the experts and can help you. We stock all the leading brands including Dunlopillo, Hypnos, Relyon, Sealy and Silentnight. If you live near our showroom at Keymer Road, Burgess Hill, West Sussex, RH15 0AD pop in and meet the team for expert advice. Alternatively give us a call on 01273 857388 and we will be happy to help improve your beauty sleep.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at